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When your performance receives vigorous applause and unanimous standing ovations with three callbacks until you play an encore, you can be pretty sure the audience enjoyed it. On Saturday night violinist Paul Huang earned all that for his performance of Antonin Dvorák’s Violin Concerto in A minor with the Long Beach Symphony - but there was more. He consistently played with precision, artistry and control, as well as a many-faceted vibrato and gift for timing.

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Laurie Niles, Violinist.com

Mr. Huang’s solo entry, only five measures in, sounded vigorously authoritative without any audible gear-change from the slow opening.[...] Fine though this was, the Allegro giocoso Finale was even more memorable, dancingly airborne from start to finish, but with Mr. Huang’s perfectly focused intonation never compromised despite the speeds. The audience cheered this magnificent performance to the Terrace Theater’s rafters, and after being called back several times Mr. Huang obliged with a richly elaborated encore that had me unsuccessfully scratching my memory, but which my knowledgeable spouse informed me was The Red Violin Caprices.

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David Brown, LA Opus
Strad Magazine September 2019 Edition

The opening of 2019 Bravo! Vail Festival was beset by last minute programming changes and inclement weather, however, it was Huang in Mozart’s Fourth Violin Concerto who provided the stand out performance of the evening. Recipient of an 2015 Avery Fisher Career Grant and a 2017 Lincoln Center Award for Emerging Artists, Huang drew an unfailingly attractive, golden and resonant tone from his 1742 ‘Wieniawski’ Guarneri ‘del Gesu’. His more expansive bowing and romantic vibrato, in contrast to the sparseness and delicacy preferred by his orchestral collaborators, served as an effective distinction between solo and chamber palettes, particularly on his lower strings. If the first movement was confident and secure, the second and third transcended technical concerns to produce phrases of uninterrupted lyricism (now changes? What bow changes?) and effortlessly bubbling spiccato. It was only when I joined the festival team on the stage for a champagne toast following the performance that I realized how cold it had been for all the musicians, despite the organizers’ best efforts to provide some warmth, making Huang’s achievement all the more remarkable.

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Charlotte Smith, The Strad

Since their previous joint appearance in concert 108 in the Foundation for Chinese Performing Arts series, esteemed collaborators pianist Helen Huang and violinist Paul Huang (no family relationship) have had five years to accumulate honors studding a deep patina of mastery. Winner of the Young Concert Artist Auditions in 2011, Paul has played with such major institutions as the Mariinsky Orchestra under Gergiev to generally ecstatic reviews. Helen’s bio describes accomplishments in solo and chamber repertoire plus concerto gigs with Berlin and New York phils and the like. Despite these individual credentials under spotlight, Helen and Paul gave plenty of rewarding evidence of their teammate stature last night at Jordan Hall in concert 129 of Cathy Chan’s estimable 30-year-old series.

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Lee Eiseman, Boston Musical Intelligencer

The way violinist Paul Huang played it and JoAnn Falletta conducted it was as if I’d never heard it before. It’s a group hug, no doubt about it. But this Taiwan-born 20-something has a sound that you are not going to forget.

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Peter Hall, Buffalo Rising

Even though it’s early in the season, but I think that in June, when we look back and take stock of the year, this weekend's concert will emerge as one of the highlights. And what really put the concert over the top is Taiwan-born violinist Paul Huang playing Samuel Barber's Violin Concerto [...] The orchestra string players, paying him the ultimate compliment, began beating on their stands with their bows. Huang began applauding them and Falletta. Everyone was cheering and celebrating.

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Mary Kunz Goldman, The Buffalo News

The contrast could hardly have been greater with the ensuing work, Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto, which brought the night’s second inspiring debut from soloist Paul Huang.

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Lawrence Johnson, Chicago Classical Reviww

Paul Huang, a hypersensitive soloist in his late 20s, and Stenz provided the evening’s balm: Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto, an audience favorite that regularly keeps more challenging American concerti (by, say, William Schuman or Roger Sessions) off concert programs. This listener does not recall any performance of the Barber, live or recorded, with greater flexibility and inwardness. The first two movements proved tender in the extreme. The presto finale was tossed off lightly, without mood-shattering angularity or trenchancy.

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Alan Artner, Chicago Tribune

On April 27, violinist Paul Huang kicked off a very busy stretch with a Kennedy Center recital with pianist Orion Weiss. The program included Dvorak, Prokofiev, Brahms, and Conrad Tao’s new Threads of Contact.

In May, Huang has Camerata Pacifica concerts at the Colburn School, a two-day visit to the Shaker village of Pleasant Hill in Kentucky, with the Lincoln Center Chamber Music Society in June, and a recital with Wu Han at the Music@Menlo Festival in July. After the Bridgehampton Festival in July, and Jan Vogler‘s Moritzburg Chamber Music Festival & Academy in August, Huang will make his Lucerne Festival debut with Weiss on September 4.

Amidst it all, on June 3, Huang will play Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy with Lior Shambadal conducting the Berliner Symphoniker.

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Laurence Vittes, Strings Magazine

Amid the plethora of performers and ensembles today focused on contemporary music, more traditionally minded concert musicians, as well, are trying to find a better balance between old and new. One is Paul Huang, a violinist whose wide-ranging and consistently compelling recital for Washington Performing Arts at the Terrace Theater on Friday night included a world premiere by Conrad Tao.

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Anne Midgette, The Washington Post

Every day I feel like I learn something new from this violin," said violinist Paul Huang, who has been playing the instrument since it was loaned to him in 2012 by the Stradivari Society of Chicago. Huang, 27, will play the instrument on Friday in a recital at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater in Washington, D.C. with pianist Orion Weiss and pianist/composer Conrad Tao.

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Laurie Niles, Violinist.com

Paul Huang is so busy performing as a guest violinist with orchestras and in chamber ensembles around the world that he spends little time in his New York apartment. But when he does, he enjoys entertaining.

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Beth Wood, San Diego Union-Tribune

When I read in the pre-concert publicity that Paul Huang has been called the next Joshua Bell, I was surprised, but when he played Prokofiev’s first sonata, with its broad and varied expressive range and its considerable technical demands on the player, I understood why. 

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Paul Merkley, Toronto Concert Reviews

No one will think of guest soloist Paul Huang, who performed with the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra at the Tennessee Theatre Thursday night as just another showman with a great violin. Huang did nothing, except play Beethoven’s 1806 Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D Major, Op. 61 gorgeously. Huang, 27, is much more a statesman of the concert stage than a showoff. He also plays with a sense of poetry few people possess at that age.

 

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Harold Duckett, KnoxTNToday

Violinist Paul Huang, joined by fine faculty pianist Dmitri Shteinberg, delivered a powerful and sublime performance of César Franck’s 1886 Sonata in A Major. While Shteinberg’s performance was expert but a bit reserved, Huang played with a depth seldom heard in contemporary violinists, let alone one who is 27 years old.

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Jim Lowe, The Times Argus

During the Mozart, in his Omaha debut, 27-year-old Taiwanese-American violinist Paul Huang was triumphant. The audience was in awe as Huang explored each melody and cadenza on his instrument.

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Drew Neneman, Omaha World-Herald

With a stoic demeanor, Huang quickly proved himself one of today’s finest young violinists; within minutes of taking the stage, he secured himself a spot beside virtuosos Itzhak Perlman and Joshua Bell.

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Gabriel Tanguay, Santa Barbara Independent
Paul Huang showed romantic style and an affinity for Franck in his recital April 17 at the Phillips Collection.

It’s not hard to see why the violinist Paul Huang walked away with an Avery Fisher Career Grant last year. Huang, who played a recital with pianist Jessica Xylina Osborne at the Phillips Collection on Sunday, possesses a big, luscious tone, spot-on intonation and a technique that makes the most punishing string phrases feel as natural as breathing. It’s the perfect sound to lavish on 19th-century violin literature.

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Joe Banno, The Washington Post

The star violinist Midori was originally supposed to play William Walton's Violin Concerto this week with the DSO, but she had to withdraw for medical reasons. She was replaced Thursday by fast-rising young Taiwanese-American violinist Paul Huang, who has already received a 2015 Avery Fisher Career Grant.

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Mark Stryker, Detroit Free Press

Violinist Paul Huang has graciously stepped in for Midori to appear with the DSO performing the Sibelius Violin Concerto

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Detroit Symphony Orchestra

Pianist Michael Brown, violinists Paul Huang, Kristin Lee and Simone Porter and violist Matthew Lipman have each been awarded an Avery Fisher Career Grant, which consists of $25,000 for career needs.

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Brian Wise, WQXR

Although he was carded at Roots the Restaurant immediately after his Paramount recital Saturday, 24-year-old violinist Paul Huang had qualities few virtuosi his age have — refinement and elegance, as well as passion and virtuosity.

 

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Jim Lowe, Rutland Herald

Mr. Huang is a rising artist... he played with a coppery, wiry bite, and ample vinegar laced his honeyed tone. This gave his sound focus and cut away at the sentimentality, even in the most poignant lyrical passages.

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Zachary Woolfe, The New York Times

The contours of natural talent, education, and unlimited personal support from his family all blend together for young Taiwanese/American violinist Paul Huang. Beyond that recognizable personality, there is an element of absolute necessity in his playing, making listening to him a gripping experience.

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Ilona Oltuski, Getclassical.com

It is a testament to just how persuasive and pedagogically effective Spence has been all these years, pressing the case for new music against aesthetically conservative audiences. The second half of the concert belonged to 24 year-old Taiwanese-American violinist Paul Huang, who dazzled the audience with his commanding tone and confident diction.

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Joseph Miller, Santa Barbara Independent

The concert's headliner was William Walton's Violin Concerto. Paul Huang, filling in for the originally scheduled soloist Elissa Lee Koljonen, displayed a brilliance that few 23-year-olds can. Huang captured its furiosity while delivering penetrating volume and sparkling technique that would be the envy of violinists twice his age.

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Michael Huebner, al.com
A rich, affecting sound from Paul Huang

The 23-year-old Paul Huang was one of three solosists featured in a gala concert for the 53rd season of Young Concert Artists (YCA). He played the Barber Violin Concerto in a programme with a clarinettist at the beginning and a pianist at the end. It was a joyous testament to what three exceptional talents can achieve before their 25th birthdays. Each seemed ready to take his place on the concert stage as a mature artist.

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Dennis Ronney, The Strad Magazine
Violinist Paul Huang and conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto at Alice Tully Hall

The Taiwanese-American violinist Paul Huang, a boyish-looking 23, gave a masterly account of Barber’s Violin Concerto. His warm, glowing sound and youthful energy were perfect for the opening movement of this justly popular work, in which a soaring melodic line flows atop the harmonically charged, restless orchestra.

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Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
Violinist Paul Huang opens the 13-14 Camerata Pacifica Season. Quoted as a classical ambassador, 23-year-old Paul Huang is making classical music fans, one airport at a time. Friday’s concerts (at 1 and 7:30 p.m. in Hahn Hall) feature two works Harbison wrote in the 1980s. That makes them older than Huang, who was born in 1990, but has already established himself as a major artist. “He sounds like a wire filament: lithe but with a metallic bite,” the New York Times wrote when he made his New York recital debut late last year. Read More...
Tom Jacob, Santa Barbara Independent
Performers like violinist Paul Huang are the reason I love live concerts. Recordings are wonderful and I am sufficiently in awe of the smart phone’s potential, but there is no substitute for watching a virtuoso performer create a work of art. Those of us attending the Louisville Orchestra’s season finale concert last Friday were part of the creative process…something to be celebrated in the face of destruction. Read More...
Scott Dowd, Arts-Louisville.com
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